CONFERENCES

IDCAR Network Members at the Conference “Unlike Twins?! Comparing Autocracies and Democracies”

The bi-annual conference of the Comparative Politics Section of the German Political Science Association (DVPW) at the University Tübingen from March 15-17, 2017 brought together many IDCAR members.

Christoph H. Stefes and Betcy Jose (University of Colorado, Denver) presented their paper “Contesting and Shaping International Norms: The Neglected Side of Autocracy Promotion” as part of the panel “Same, Same but Different? Comparing the International Promotion of Democracy and Autocracy.”

Thomas Richter and Christian von Soest (GIGA) chaired the panel “State Spending and Taxation in Democracies and Autocracies: Comparing Patterns of Resource Management.“ As part of this panel, Richter presented a new paper titled "Taxation and the Formation of Political Institutions: An Explorative Analysis.”

As part of the panel “Dimensions of Authoritarianism,” Thomas Demmelhuber and Tobias Zumbrägel (University of Erlangen) presented the paper "Regional Organizations as Transmission Belt and Learning Room of Authoritarianism: Comparative Perspectives and Empirical Evidence” from their DFG project with Marianne Kneuer. André Bank also presented his paper “Authoritarian Learning and Transnational Diffusion.”

As part of the panel “Bridging Comparative Politics and Area Studies,” Christian von Soest (GIGA) and Alexander Stroh (University of Bayreuth) introduced their paper “Comparing across World Regions: Assets and Pitfalls.” André Bank (GIGA) presented a second paper entitled “Comparative Area Studies and the Study of Middle East Politics after the Arab Uprisings.”

The panel “Why Wrong Is Right: Justifying Exclusion and Repression in Autocracies and Democracies,” chaired by Maria Josua (GIGA), featured a new piece by Aurel Croissant, David Kuehn, Tanja Eschenauer (Heidelberg University), titled “The ‘Dictator’s Endgame’: Explaining Military Behavior in Nonviolent Anti-Incumbent Mass Protests.”

Alexander Schmotz (King's College, London) also presented his piece “Revolution Gone Awry: Popular Uprisings, Regime Breakdown, and State Failure.”

For more information on the Conference, click here.